Festivity policy

 

People of all nationalities and faiths should feel welcome and at home at SISS. We believe that a genuinely religious ethos is based on universal values which are formative for people of all faiths and is respectful of traditions other than our own. The presence of children from different/ other cultural backgrounds and denominations is seen as an enrichment of the educational experience offered by the school and as a practical expression of the commitment to inclusive education. Throughout the academic year there are opportunities for families from different cultural backgrounds and faiths to share their traditions (e.g. Diwali celebration, Ramadan, Sugar Feast). This is considered as a genuine, hands-on opportunity to learn about certain traditions from peers, parent volunteers or teachers.

We also wish to uphold the host country’s culture, traditions and “characteristic spirit” which to some extent have their roots in a religious context. Certain events are extracurricular (e.g. “Schuldorf Schulfest” ,“Halloween Spooktacular”, “Feuerfest”, “International festival”). Other festivities are part of the curriculum ( e.g. “Carnival”, “Lanternwalk” in Lower Primary, “Christmas market” / “Christmas production” for the whole Primary School,”). During the preparation period for these events some lessons, e.g. in IPC, Art, Music, Assembly, will be dedicated towards the event. Depending on the character of the event this can include practicing and rehearsing lines, poems, songs and/or dances as well as props or gift making activities (cross curricular approach). Out of respect for the sensitive areas of other faiths and cultures, our aim for our whole school production around Christmas is to present a variety of contents with a focus also on non-religious aspects. No-one will be expected to pray, say or do anything against their beliefs.

At the SISS we consider school festivities and celebrations as a valuable and enriching experience in the child’s education. The children work together to put on a production or be part of an event. They develop social and emotional skills such as teamwork, confidence and patience.

We strongly believe that involvement in festivities and celebrations benefits the whole school community. It accomplishes a community feeling and supports a cooperate identity

Uta Wetterich 2017

The Adventure Playgarden

Natural environment and space to experience for children in school

Where was your absolutely favourite place to play as a child?

Remember how exciting it was to explore the world outside.

Experience adventures, make discoveries – that’s all part of growing up.

It is the way that children learn about themselves and the world around them.

Sadly children today are unable or not allowed to go out to play and engage freely in play activities that a generation ago would have been taken for granted. Children should have the opportunities to explore, experiment, and experience the wide, wonderful world around them.

By providing outdoor activities Adventure Playgrounds create opportunities for children to learn cooperation, meet physical challenges and gain self-confidence.

As the all-day care of the SISS we initiated and set up an Adventure Playground on the school campus called Playgarden.

Together with the children and adolescents we create a space in our Playgarden, which is unique and special, with many fantastic benefits.

Among other activities each day we offer many different projects with the main topics crafting, nature and environmental education which also addressing sustainable thinking and acting. (see Supervision Program)

Our Playgarden is a lively, growing project!

We are looking forward to meeting you and your child there.

Bilingual Library

All Flex primary classes go to the bilingual library once per week, where both German and English books are available. All Year 3 and Year 4 classes will go to the bilingual library at least once every other week.

Every student is allowed to check out two books at a time for a period of two weeks. Of course if your child returns the books by the following week then they may check out new books at this time. Each student is provided with a “Library Rules” sheet at the beginning of the year to bring home and review with you and sign (parent and child). This sheet not only explains check out procedures but also reminds the families that they are responsible for replacing damaged or lost books. Your child needs to return the signed library permission slip before being allowed to take books home from the library.

Handwriting

Children will begin to learn the Nelson style of pre-cursive handwriting in Flexible Lower Primary 1st learning year and cursive handwriting in Flexible Lower Primary 2nd learning year.
This will be reinforced in Year 3. During Year 4, use of joined-up/cursive handwriting will be required.

  • Teaching of handwriting skills happens regularly in years 1 - 3 and specific children or small groups are targeted to rectify identified problems before they become a habit. The principle of regular, short periods of handwriting practice is prominent in this part of the school.
  • There is a gradual transfer to cursive, ('joined up') writing from the appropriate moment in Year 2. However, children develop physical pencil control at different rates and they are only introduced to the Nelson letter joins when confident with the previous step.
  • Flexible Lower Primary children usually have their own work book which guides letter formation in very visual and structured ways on the page, also permitting practice through 'overwriting'. From Year 3 children produce letter joins more independently from Nelson handwriting text books. The Nelson spelling course books also demonstrate letter joins within the context of common letter strings.
  • In Y3 a fountain pen license will be given to the children after passing special handwriting exercises. During Year 4, the use of the fountain pen and cursive handwriting will be required.
  • The German 'Schul-Ausgangsschrift' can be introduced in German to children from Year 3 and it offers a natural and logical extension to the 'Nelson' script by introducing the option of loops for descenders in letters like 'g' or 'y'. A few other specific differences are also introduced to children at this stage.

Learning Support

Learning support

In case of ongoing and/or severe learning difficulties in one or more subject areas a learning support plan will be set up.

The class teacher/subject teacher will meet the parents to discuss individual tasks for the child and to monitor and evaluate the child's progress in further meetings after a period of time. A close working relationship between parents, child and school will help to improve the child's development.

Dyscalculia/ Dyslexia

If your child has been diagnosed with one or both of these learning difficulties, please notify your class teachers.

Parents can apply for a „Nachteilausgleich“/special compensation, that adjusts the child’s test and work achievements. The class teacher will provide guidance in the process of applying for a special compensations/ learning support and progress consultations with the parents/guardians throughout the year.

 

Special Compensation/Nachteilsausgleich

(see“ Verordnung zur Gestaltung des Schulverhältnisses (VOGSV) vom 19. August 2011“ )

§7 Special compensation

(1) Children suffering from a temporary handicap (e.g. fractured arm) or other diagnosed handicaps that still allows them to take part in lessons should be treated with consideration in lessons as well as when having oral, written or practical tests regarding their special needs.

(2) Different kinds of special compensation can be:

a. Extended working time for class tests

b. Permission to work with dictionaries, computer and/or audio support

c. Use of specifically arranged worksheets

d. Differentiated exercises, in particular when difficulties occur in the subjects of German, foreign languages (dyslexia) and math (dyscalculia)

(3) The parents have to submit a written formal request. The head teacher will decide whether a special compensation will be granted (and for how long). This decision will be made after consultation with the class conference. If a special compensation is granted it will be indicated in the child’s learning support plan.

Homework

Homework will be given:

  • To provide opportunities for practice of basic skills and learning of important facts that cannot be memorized entirely within the teaching session.
  • To give young children the opportunity to consolidate a skill learnt in class.
  • To offer older the opportunity of independent enquiry and gathering of information to be shared in class.
  • To encourage children to establish routines and a degree of self-organization and responsibility

Especially in the lower age groups the principle of 'a little often' should be applied. In the upper primary a significant amount of revision for tests will be an integral part of preceding lessons; where reading over of notes or practice exercises are required, these should be part of homework tasks.

All homework given to the children will be explained in class, so that parents' help should not be necessary. In instances where the child needs support or was unable to complete the task, a note should be written by the parent in the homework diary or on the homework sheet as feed back for the teacher.

There must be at least a day between setting and return of homework tasks.

Recommended timing guidance:
Flexible Lower Primary Years -> not more then 20 – 30 minutes to cover all tasks.
Year 3/4 -> apprx 45 minutes to cover all tasks

Break (snack/lunch)

Morning break

During the morning break children have the opportunity to eat a small snack that they have brought to school. A snack box is recommended to transport food to school to avoid your child’s rucksack and supplies from being stained. Again, please do not pack pretzels, puddings, cakes or candy. We also encourage you to provide water, rather than juice, in your child’s drinking bottle.

Lunch

All classes are given 25 minutes to eat their lunch in the cafeteria.

A catering company provides warm lunch to those children who have been registered in the lunch programme and have ordered food for that day. You will receive a lunch registration package when your child is admitted into SISS.

For those opting for the warm lunch service, once your online registration is completed and funds transferred, parents are responsible to order their child’s lunch (the school has no means to place orders). There is always the choice between a vegetarian and a non-vegetarian menu. Typically orders may be placed up to a month in advance. If necessary (i.e. illness), cancellations for that day’s lunch may be placed until 7:45 a.m. the same morning of the absence.

Children receiving hot lunch will receive dessert without prerequisite (children will not be told to eat more of their entrée before receiving dessert.)

Parents may of course choose to provide a packed lunch for their children. In accordance with the Schuldorf “Healthy School” policy Parents are encouraged to provide a healthy lunch and beverage for their children.

Year 4 students are provided access to a microwave for re-heating food. The microwave is not available for lower grades since there is not enough time (or staff to supervise use of the microwave) during the class lunch slots to allow for a long queue to warm up food.

Dining hall rules

Our aim is to keep noise levels down to reasonable levels (so that we can talk to others at the table). The children calm down and line up before moving quietly to the serving area. Dining hall rules will be discussed in each class at the beginning of the year. Year groups have to agree on the rules according to their needs. Occasionally the noise traffic light in the dining hall will be switched on in order to provide a visual reminder to children about their noise level. If the red light goes on, the children will be asked to eat in silence for 3 minutes.

Grading and Reports

Grading

Grading at SISS is based on the German system with the following percentage/grade correspondence: (useful when grading assessments with points). Test grades are set in accordance with Hesse state guidance on percentages and there is considerable monitoring of marking levels between German and English teachers. Marks are given between 1 and 6. The average score for a test marking level is 2 to 3.

100 - 93% = 1
92 - 77% = 2
76 - 61% = 3
60 - 45% = 4
44 - 20% = 5
19 - 0% = 6

Assessments are usually given at the end of each main module (English, German, maths or science) in order to check your child’s ability to apply new skills and knowledge independently. In Literacy, maths, and German the number of 45 min assessments is three per semester in upper primary.

At least one week of written notice (diary) will be given prior to every assessment, with an indication of areas to be reviewed

In Year 3/4 all assessments are sent home for parent review and signature. All assessment results include the class average and the grade distribution on the assessment. We ask you to sign the sheet to show that you have seen it. Equally children will occasionally be asked by their teacher to show you their class exercise book and sign to confirm this.

In Flex, there is no required number of assessments per semester. Assessments are informal; they are not graded or sent home.

Report Cards

In Flexible Lower Primary official reports will be given at the end of the school year (before the summer break starts). From Year 3 onwards two official reports of individual progress will be released (at the end of January for the first semester, and in July/August for the second semester). Teachers discuss reports with Year 3/4 children before sending the reports home. The report will contain comments and achievement grades for behaviour, attitude and also for each individual subject. As is the case in the German state system, these grades will be derived from a combination of contribution to class work (50%), homework/presentations (25%) and assessment results (25%) .

Teachers will also approach you if your child seems to be displaying exceptional talent, leading to the need for extension and further challenge. We will also inform you of significant learning difficulties if they become apparent during the term.

Please don’t hesitate to make an appointment with the classroom teacher if you have concerns or questions about your child’s progress. We value every opportunity to maintain a dialogue about this.

Application

At the SISS Primary, we accept students after a two day assessment visit. The main criteria for acceptance at the SISS Primary are English language abilities. General school readiness is a requirement for those children who are applying for Flexible Lower Primary Year1 (see Admission)

The language of instruction is English and 85% of the lessons are taught in English (following the English National as well as the IPC curriculum). In order to be able to cope with the curriculum, the command of the English language (native speaker level) is a requirement for admission.

The student’s ability to follow lessons in the age-appropriate year group will be assessed during a two morning visit at our school. Due to differences between international school systems we reserve the right to make internal decisions about the child’s placement in the appropriate SISS year.

Applications for school starters (Flexible Lower Primary Year 1) should ideally be submitted between 1 November and 15 February. Should you choose to enroll a school starter child in the SISS, the requirements of the State School Law (Hessisches Schulgesetz) must be adhered to. This includes a physical examination by a doctor from the local County Health Department, known here as the ‘Schularzt’.

We accept applications for Primary Year 2 -4 throughout the school year. It is important for families applying to SISS Primary to understand that space for new students may be limited. We therefore strongly recommend that, if possible, families begin the application process four months prior to the start of school.

Application Process

To apply for admission, please complete our online application. In addition to the online application, we require:

  • Copies of student passport and birth certificate
  • School transcripts and records for the past two years (in English)
  • A current passport-sized photograph of the student
  • For school starters a copy of the “Einschulungsuntersuchung” (official health certificate from the local County Health Department)

The entire application will take approximately 6 – 8 weeks.

Please be aware, that schooling in Germany is compulsory. For administrative reasons, the local German primary school needs to be contacted as soon as you have a residence regardless of your application at the SISS. In case of admittance to the SISS Primary a formal request of school change is needed, the so called “Gestattungsantrag”. You can find the “Gestattungsantrag” in our download section. Please hand in this form at your local school after admission.

Bullying Prevention and Intervention Policy

Bullying in schools is a challenging subject for all educational staff.

The definition of the word bullying can and has been understood in different ways indifferent times and different societies. In everyday language there is a wide range of behaviourcovered by this word. In the school environment bullying is different to thenormal rough and tumble of play.

Bullying can be single actions in which a person uses their strength or power to gain anadvantage, to hurt, frighten or intimidate a weaker person (e.g. pushing past others onthe stairs, using the belongings of others without asking, insulting words ...).However not every conflict is an example of bullying.

If we translate this form of the understanding of what a bully is into German, it wouldbe “brutaler Kerl” or “Tyrann” (male or female).

Now we look at the part of the definition of bullying which has the same meaning as theGerman understanding of the word “mobbing”.

There are five clear indications of this form of bullying which, from now on, we refer toas bullying/mobbing. These are clearly different to other forms of violence:

  1. Imbalance of power: the victim stands alone against one or many perpetratorsand their sympathizers. “The word bullying/mobbing is not used when twochildren who are of equal physical or emotional strength fight or disagree witheach other.”
  2. Frequency: the incidents of violence occur at least once a week.
  3. Duration: the incidents occur over a longer period of time (weeks or months).A conflict which lasts only a few days is not bullying/mobbing.
  4. Solution of the Conflict: the victim does not have the power to end the bullying/mobbing alone.
  5. Exclusion: one aim (conscious or unconscious) of the bullying/mobbing is toexclude the victim from the group.

However, bullying/mobbing is often not recognised because the victims, maybe out offear or shame, are slow to communicate the problem to the adults around them.

PREVENTION

Bullying/mobbing that occurs in school must be solved in school. Prevention methodsdo not just involve the victim and perpetrator but the whole school as a social network.The basis of prevention is to make our school a safe place for all the members of ourcommunity.

Social competences must start to be learnt from the beginning of school life (especiallyin the earliest classes) in order to develop socially appropriate and socially acceptablebehaviour.

This behaviour is based on uniform clear guidelines that apply to the whole Schuldorfand form its “Leitsätze” (Mission Statements) (www.schuldorf.de, Schulprogramm,point 3.3).

The following of these rules is continuously observed.

After the breaking of these rules there follow timely sanctions as detailed in the SchuldorfSchulordnung (www.schuldorf.de, then Service/ Download), which is based on theHessische Schulgesetz (www.kultusministerium.hessen.de).

For the State International Primary School these guidelines are simplified into theGolden Rules.

SISS GOLDEN RULES

  • We treat each other respectfully. Nobody gets hit, pushed, insulted or picked on.
  • Everybody is allowed to say what they think. Nobody gets laughed at.
  • We listen to each other.
  • We handle problems as soon as possible. We talk to each other, use the STOP sign and, if necessary, ask an adult for help.
  • We treat animals and plants with respect.
  • We take good care of our own belongings and those of others.
  • We look after our school and keep it clean and tidy.
  • We respect the dining hall rules.
  • We respect the toilet rules.
  • Inside the school building we keep our voices down.
  • We walk on the stairs slowly and with care.
  • For running, playing, jumping etc we use the playground.

INTERVENTION

In cases of “small violence” or minor conflicts, a clear word from a peer or an adultusually suffices. For more complicated issues, depending on the situation, small groupor whole class etc. sessions (mediation, behaviour management based on effective behaviouraltherapy, situational approaches ...) mostly lead to a solution.

In cases of bullying/mobbing the protection of the victim is of supreme importance(physical/psychological protection, reinforcement of self esteem, reinforcement of socialcompetences to build friendships...).Depending on the situation, constructive behaviour may be supported or sanctions usedto punish problematic behaviour.

A variety of anti-bullying/ mobbing strategies are feasible: meeting with victim, meetingwith perpetrator, counselling of groups/ classes; rehearsing anti aggression strategies;rehearsing civil courage; recognizing, setting, defending and respecting boundaries.

The “No Blame Approach” (developed in the early 1990s by Barbara Maines andGeorge Robinson, England) is a method used in the SISS and whole Schuldorf. Withthe “No Blame Approach” despite the severity of the whole area of concern it is trustedthat the children and adolescents have the capability and resources to produce an effectivesolution. This method has shown great success. In most of the documented cases,bullying/mobbing could be stopped swiftly (www.no-blame-approach.de).

In dealing with bullying in all its forms in the SISS, we have the professional experienceof Mrs Lehn, Diplom Sozialpädagogin, Primary and Mrs Koniarski, Head of Supervision,who work in close cooperation with each other and the Educational Team.

They are also the link to external specialists such as psychologists, therapists and otherforms of support. The whole Schuldorf Prevention Team can be reached on the emailhotline .

If you have concerns that your child may be bullied/mobbed (because she/he is afraid togo to school, often complains of headaches or stomach aches, “looses money”, sleepingproblems) please contact the school.

If we have concerns about an individual child, that parents should be aware of, they willbe informed by the class teacher or the Social Pedagogue.

Helpful Links:

For students:

www.schueler-mobbing.de
www.jugend-und-bildung.de
www.childline.org.uk
www.gewalt-an-schulen.de/material
Information about “visionary”, a European cooperative project can be found at
www.gewalt-in-der-schule.info

Written by C. Elliott, A. Koniarski and J. Lehn, June 2011

SISS Primary Golden Rules

  • We treat each other respectfully. Nobody gets hit, pushed, insulted or picked on.
  • Everybody is allowed to say what they think. Nobody gets laughed at.
  • We listen to each other.
  • We handle problems as soon as possible. We talk to each other, use the STOP sign and, if necessary, ask an adult for help.
  • We treat animals and plants with respect.
  • We take good care of our own belongings and those of others.
  • We look after our school and keep it clean and tidy.
  • We respect the dining hall rules.
  • We respect the toilet rules.
  • Inside the school building we keep our voices down.
  • We walk on the stairs slowly and with care.
  • For running, playing, jumping etc we use the playground.

Dismissal

In Flexible Lower Primary all children will be brought down to the playground by their class teacher or TA (or subject teacher, as applicable) at the end of the school day. Flexible Lower Primary Teachers/TAs are responsible for placing unclaimed children into Supervision. Supervision starts at 3:05pm.

In Year 3, the same rules apply until a point during 2nd term. After this point, Year 3 children will be dismissed from class (i.e., sent down from the classroom alone).
Year 3 teachers will remind parents of this change, in writing, prior to its implementation.

Year 4 and up can be dismissed from their last class in the afternoon (i.e., sent down alone/ back to school alone.)

Year 3 & up children are responsible for going to Supervision themselves if their parent or guardian is late.

Children may not stay on the playground after school unless they are signed-in to Supervision.

Accidents

Teachers & Staff will offer plasters/Band-Aids to children if the child indicates that they are allowed to have one.

School paramedics will be called in case of other injuries.

In emergencies the ambulance and the parents will be called immediately. For this reason please always update your contact details with the office.

In cases of head injuries – even minor ones - parents will be informed immediately.

If your child had an accident at school, the procedure is -in general- as follows:

  • The student will be brought to the fist aid room (first aid equipment/ice pack available).
  • The “Schulsanitätsdienst” (student first aiders) will be called if necessary; in severe cases an ambulance will be involved.

If your child needs to see a doctor after his/her accident, please send an email to with the name, address and phone number of the doctor you went to. The school needs to submit an official accident report to the Unfallkasse Hessen. This is also applicable for accidents on the way to or from school.

Absences

Absences due to illness
Please be sure to contact the school office (06257/970350) by 8:30 a.m. should your child need to stay home due to illness. To ensure a healthy learning environment for all students, faculty and staff, please be sure to keep a child home a minimum of 24 hours after the end of a fever, diarrhoea, or vomiting. Absences due to normal illnesses do not require a written medical excuse. You may either contact the office each morning to report your child’s absence, or simply provide an estimated return date.
If a child is not in school at snack time and there has been no prior communication about absence, the teacher /TA or secretary will call the parent to find out where the child is (using all parent emergency contact details.)
Medical excuses are required in cases of a contagious disease or infection/health condition (i.e., chicken box, scarlet fever, head lice). In such instances, the school office should be notified immediately so that a message stating the exposure to such illnesses can be issued to the families of the affected class, or the entire Primary. A medical release from the doctor must also be submitted upon the child’s return to school in such cases.
No medicines will be given to the children. If a child's health constitution requires medicine the child should stay at home.

Requested absences
Unlike Kindergarten which has voluntary attendance, school attendance is mandatory and regulated by the State of Hessen. Therefore, grounds for an absence must be defined in a request. Should a family need to ask for a leave of absence for the child, a written request must be filed as follows. For your information you can find the guidelines issued by Hessen for acceptable grounds for requesting an absence in the download section ( see “Hinweise zur Beurlaubung von Schülern”) Please be sure to submit a request along with any supporting documentation to the following parties as outlined below:

Absences lasting no longer than three days, not centred around an official school holiday
Class teacher’s responsibility: A written note/ letter to the class teacher stating the dates and reason for the absence should be submitted a few days prior to the planned absence.
Any of the above absences will be noted on your child’s semester/end of year report as “Missed Days” and “Authorised/Unauthorised”.

Absences of less than one day due to appointments/other personal situation
Class teacher’s responsibility: Some appointments cannot be scheduled outside school hours. In these cases, a written note to the class/ subject teacher a day or two before the early dismissal request will suffice. Be sure to mention what time your child will have to leave and who will be picking him/her up from school.
These absences will not be noted as a “Missed Day” on your child’s register.

Extended long weekends or absences tied to an official school holiday
Responsibility of Primary Headteacher in accordance with Schuldorf Director : The request should be submitted no later than four (4) weeks before your planned absence to the SISS Primary Secretary’s office. To avoid any unnecessary complications, it is advised not to book a trip until you have received a written approval for the extended leave. A copy of your request along with the management decision will be kept in your child’s records. The existence of an important reason is to be confirmed upon request by suitable means (i.e. certificates). Booked tickets or other travel arrangements are no reason for a leave of absence.
It is in the parents’/legal guardians’ interest to follow-up with the administration for the status of their request e.g. if notification has not been received after three weeks.
If no written approval from the school administration has been issued, and the absence is taken regardless, then it will be noted in the student’s report as an unauthorized absence.

 

Flexible Lower Primary Concept

The Flexible Lower Primary concept is designed to give the child the optimal start tohis/her school life, to have the time necessary to develop academic as well as personaland social skills. The “Hessische Kultusministerium” (Hesse Ministery of Culture)HKM promotes the use of the “Flexible Lower Primary”-concept (Flex).As an International School we have children with different educational and culturalbackgrounds. Moreover, our children learn to read and write in two languages, thus facinggreater challenges than children in national State Schools. To react to the differentindividual needs of each child, differentiation in many ways is necessary.

In Flexible Lower Primary classes children are usually aged between 6 and 8 years; theyare taught together in mixed age classes. As exceptions younger children can be considered.All children have the opportunity to take 1, 2 or 3 years to complete the Curriculumrequired to enter Year 3. During Flexible Lower Primary Years the children willcover objectives of the British National Curriculum in Maths and Literacy for Reception,Years 1, 2 and 3. German follows the Curriculum of the State of Hesse, history,geography and science follow the International Primary Curriculum (IPC).

In some subjects, (Literacy, Maths and German) more homogenous groups are formedto give specific encouragement. In these subjects the children will be grouped by theirage, which is often related to their learning year in school. All groups of the same learningyear follow the same core curriculum; however, methods, materials and extensionsmay vary according to the groups’ needs. In general, grouping will not be considereduntil after the second week to usually be finished by the autumn break. Currently, thefirst groups to be formed are for Literacy, followed by Maths and finally German.

As this is a whole day school, our children have 5 -9 more lessons per week than childrenin German national State schools. Homework is only given in the main subjectswhen the need arises to review what has already been taught. There will not be morethan one piece of homework given per main subject per week. In addition to this, dailypractice of subjects such as reading will be expected. The time required should not exceed20 min per day.Schuldorf Bergstraße / SISS | Community School | Sandstraße | 64342 Seeheim-JugenheimState International School Seeheim-JugenheimKooperative Gesamtschule mit Primarstufe, Internationalem Schulzweig und Gymnasialer Oberstufe | Landkreis Darmstadt-DieburgSandstraße | D-64342 Seeheim-JugenheimFon 0 62 57 - 97 03-50 | Fax 0 62 57 - 97 03-54 | | www.schuldorf.deSprechzeiten nach Vereinbarung | Anrufe bitte zwischen 08.00-11.00 Uhr

The HKM provides the SISS with a “Diplom-Sozialpädagoge” (Social Pedagogue) tooffer support and advice. Social Pedagogues work closely with the classroom teachers;important decisions are made together.To understand more easily the different roles of these professionals, imagine two overlappingcircles: classroom teachers are more involved with curriculum areas whereasSocial Pedagogues are more involved with the emotional, social and physical developmentof the children. Their input is of equal relevance, each part reinforces the other.

Social Pedagogues and teachers discuss where general or individual support is needed,both within and outside school.

Within the school Social Pedagogues have a variety of roles, which includes supportstrategies regarding the development of the whole child as well as prevention and reductionof problems.The work of Social Pedagogues follows many different approaches. In response to thewide range of issues, depending on urgency and time, priorities will be set by the SocialPedagogue.Areas of Social Pedagogues’ work include:

• Counselling of and support to teaching staff

• Support to pupils through individual, small group, whole-class activities

• Parent conferences and counselling

• Links to local support organizations and internal organisational and administrativetasks.

As we do respect each child’s right to confidentiality we request parents not to ask theSocial Pedagogue questions about the contents of group sessions. When there are concernsabout an individual child, the parents will be informed by the class teacher or theSocial Pedagogue.

If a sequence of one-to-one sessions is advisable, apart from situations that require immediateresponse, parents will receive prior notice.

The cooperation between Social Pedagogue and parents requires trust and openness formaximum benefit to the children concerned.

Where a child needs ongoing support the parents will be referred to external professionalsin the area (see information received on application).

Appointments with the Social Pedagogue can be made through the School Secretary, theclass teacher or directly through the Social Pedagogue’s letterbox in the entrance area.

March 2012

Friends Association

The state-registered Förderverein of the State International School and Preschool e.V. was first established in August 2001.

Its first and most important aim being to identify the political, financial, spacial planning, organisational and staffing requirements for the establishment of the Preschool and the State International School and to pave the way for its swift realisation. All of the above, including the erection of the new school building, was accomplished within a few years. Today the voluntary, fund-raising organisation concentrates its efforts on assisting and maintaining both institutions, with the help of donations and private and corporate sponsorship.

The persuasive efforts of the initiator of the State International School project, the former Minister for Economic Affairs of the state of Hesse, Mr. Klaus-Jürgen Hoffie, led to a resolution in the local county council in June 2001, and a year later to the formation of a registered support association(Förderverein).

During the initial years of establishment and development, and due to the often political nature of the whole enterprise, it was mainly figures from the fields of commerce and politics, and above all, representatives from the administrative authorities, the county council, the local community, and the Schuldorf, who took overall responsibility for the project. Today it is mainly the school’s parents who constitute the foundation of the Förderverein.

You can find out more about the Förderverein here.

To help support the Förderverein, support SISS, please consider becoming a member. The yearly minimum contribution per family is 60 Euro (after taxes this works out to be less than 3 Euro a month!). If you own your own business or work in a firm that might be interested in sponsoring our school please also contact Ms. Ina Mallon for more information (Tel: 06257-9703-73, )

Parent Representatives (PR)

Role of Parent Representatives

Each class in Primary elects two representatives at the beginning of the academic year.

They are elected for two years so the elections usually take place in the first and third year.

The role of parent reps is to act as a liaison between parents and school management. They support the class teacher with special school activities such as sports day, class trips or celebrations. Parent Rep meetings together with the Primary headteacher take place every 6 – 8 weeks. On this occasion school news is shared and parental concerns may be raised.

Parent evenings

The purpose of parent evenings is to inform parents about class routines, class trips, the curriculum, to plan social events for the class, etc. A minimum of one parent evening per semester is required.

The first parent evening has to take place within the first six weeks of term. In Flex classes and Year 3, elections of the parent representatives will take place on this evening (election forms available in the office). Dates for the first parent evenings will be agreed upon in the staff meeting, and a general invitation will be send to all parents from the office.

All following parent evenings have to be arranged by the parent rep of the class in agreement with the class teacher (coordination within the year group might be useful). The parent rep will invite both the parents and the class teacher/subject teachers. Invitations and agenda of the meeting should be sent to the parents and teachers at least ten days in advance.

Subjects

We teach the following number of 45 minute sessions weekly at the primary level (Year 1 - Year 4):

subjects

*Many 'subjects' are integrated within an International Primary Curriculum (IPC) theme or topic.

English and German

The overarching aim for English and German in the national curriculums is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. The national curriculum for English as well as for German aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

(see: „The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014“ and “Bildungsstandards und Inhaltsfelder, das neue Kerncurriculum Primarstufe Deutsch” )

Maths

The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

Mathematics is an interconnected subject in which pupils need to be able to move fluently between representations of mathematical ideas. The programmes of study are, by necessity, organised into apparently distinct domains, but pupils should make rich connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to science and other subjects.

The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

German Additional Language/ Deutsch als Fremdsprache

In every year group we have classes to support children who are significantly below the level of mother tongue German for their age. These classes often take place at the same time as normal German classes and there may also be some sessions at 8:00 am before school. German Additional Language classes usually cover three different levels: beginners, intermediate and advanced.

English as an additional language (EAL)

We have a full-time EAL teacher employed to support groups of children across the school who may require assistance with English language structures or vocabulary. Support sometimes happens within English, Math or Science lessons to help children access the curriculum more effectively. There are also classes at other times in the week, sometimes before school starting at 8:00 am. The EAL teacher will inform you about the teaching session times at the beginning of the year.

Science

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos.

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.

Art and Design

Pupils develop their creativity and imagination by exploring the visual, tactile and sensory qualities of materials and processes. They learn about the role of art, craft and design in their environment. They begin to understand colour, shape and space and pattern and texture and use them to represent their ideas and feelings.

During Key Stage 2 pupils develop their creativity and imagination through more complex activities. These help to build on their skills and improve their control of materials, tools and techniques. They increase their critical awareness of the roles and purposes of art, craft and design in different times and cultures. They become more confident in using visual and tactile elements and materials and processes to communicate what they see, feel and think.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

Music

During Key Stage 1 pupils listen carefully and respond physically to a wide range of music. They play musical instruments and sing a variety of songs from memory, adding accompaniments and creating short compositions, with increasing confidence, imagination and control. They explore and enjoy how sounds and silence can create different moods and effects.

During Key Stage 2 pupils sing songs and play instruments with increasing confidence, skill, expression and awareness of their own contribution to a group or class performance. They improvise, and develop their own musical compositions, in response to a variety of different stimuli with increasing personal involvement, independence and creativity. They explore their thoughts and feelings through responding physically, intellectually and emotionally to a variety of music from different times and cultures.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

ICT

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

International Primary Curriculum

The four main aims of the IPC are:

  • to help children learn the subject knowledge, skills and understandings they need to become aware of the world around them
  • to help children develop the personal skills they need to take an active part in the world throughout their lives
  • to help children develop an international mindset alongside their awareness of their own nationality.
  • to do each of these in ways which take intoaccount up-to-date research into how children learn and how they can be encouraged to be life-long learners.

(see: THE INTERNATIONAL PRIMARY CURRICULUM 2003)

Physical Education

A high-quality physical education curriculum inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. It should provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect.

The national curriculums for physical education aims to ensure that all pupils: develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities; are physically active for sustained periods of time; engage in competitive sports and activities; lead healthy, active lives.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

Physical Education (PE) / Year 3 swimming classes

PE equipment: Please provide a complete change of sports clothing to include: a T-shirt, shorts/sweat pants, non-marking hard soled PE shoes as well as Gymnastic shoes. In good weather, classes may be held either outside or inside so it is important to provide your child with all the items each week to allow the sports teacher flexibility.

Year 3 children participate in a one-semester swimming instruction instead of the 2 weekly PE sessions. Parents will receive a detailed information and questionnaire prior to the beginning of the course. The course is held in a public indoor pool and transportation as well as admission is paid for by the Landkreis. If the facility has an outdoor pool, it will be used when weather permits.

For PE including swimming classes all children are required to change clothes prior to and after class. One changing room for girls and one for boys are available for Y3 and Y4. Flexible Lower Primary classes might use a common changing room together depending on the facilities.

Personal, Social, Health Education (PSHE) / Religious Education (RE)

Pupils learn about themselves as developing individuals and as members of their communities, building on their own experiences and on the early learning goals for personal, social and emotional development. They learn the basic rules and skills for keeping themselves healthy and safe and for behaving well. They have opportunities to show they can take some responsibility for themselves and their environment. They begin to learn about their own and other people's feelings and become aware of the views, needs and rights of other children and older people. As members of a class and school community, they learn social skills such as how to share, take turns, play, help others, resolve simple arguments and resist bullying. They begin to take an active part in the life of their school and its neighbourhood.

During key stage 2 pupils learn about themselves as growing and changing individuals with their own experiences and ideas, and as members of their communities. They become more mature, independent and self-confident. They learn about the wider world and the interdependence of communities within it. They develop their sense of social justice and moral responsibility and begin to understand that their own choices and behaviour can affect local, national or global issues and political and social institutions. They learn how to take part more fully in school and community activities. As they begin to develop into young adults, they face the changes of puberty and transfer to secondary school with support and encouragement from their school. They learn how to make more confident and informed choices about their health and environment; to take more responsibility, individually and as a group, for their own learning; and to resist bullying.

(see: The National Curriculum in England, framework document, July 2014)

In RE we follow the German State requirements to teach aspects of the Christian faith to all children. We also have a multi-religious approach which studies, celebrates and shares the religions of many of our families from around the world. The German school offers Christian study classes to cover preparation first communion (catholic) which are open for our children to attend. If you have further questions about RE, please contact the school.

Grading and Reports

Grading

Grading at SISS is based on the German system with the following percentage/grade correspondence: (useful when grading assessments with points). Test grades are set in accordance with Hesse state guidance on percentages and there is considerable monitoring of marking levels between German and English teachers. Marks are given between 1 and 6. The average score for a test marking level is 2 to 3.

100 - 93% = 1

92 - 77% = 2

76 - 61% = 3

60 - 45% = 4

44 - 20% = 5

19 - 0% = 6

Assessments are usually given at the end of each main module (English, German, maths or science) in order to check your child’s ability to apply new skills and knowledge independently. In Literacy, maths, and German the number of 45 min assessments is three per semester in upper primary.

At least one week of written notice (diary) will be given prior to every assessment, with an indication of areas to be reviewed

In Year 3/4 all assessments are sent home for parent review and signature. All assessment results include the class average and the grade distribution on the assessment. We ask you to sign the sheet to show that you have seen it. Equally children will occasionally be asked by their teacher to show you their class exercise book and sign to confirm this.

In Flex, there is no required number of assessments per semester. Assessments are informal; they are not graded or sent home.

Report Cards

In Flexible Lower Primary official reports will be given at the end of the school year (before the summer break starts). From Year 3 onwards two official reports of individual progress will be released (at the end of January for the first semester, and in July/August for the second semester). Teachers discuss reports with Year 3/4 children before sending the reports home. The report will contain comments and achievement grades for behaviour, attitude and also for each individual subject. As is the case in the German state system, these grades will be derived from a combination of contribution to class work (50%), homework/presentations (25%) and assessment results (25%) .

Teachers will also approach you if your child seems to be displaying exceptional talent, leading to the need for extension and further challenge. We will also inform you of significant learning difficulties if they become apparent during the term.

Please don’t hesitate to make an appointment with the classroom teacher if you have concerns or questions about your child’s progress. We value every opportunity to maintain a dialogue about this.

Unterkategorien